In Parliament

There are three elements to Parliament today: the Crown, the House of Lords, and the House of Commons. These three elements work together to effectively ‘run’ the country by examining and challenging the work of the government (scrutiny), debating and passing laws (legislation), and enabling the government to raise taxes.

Founded on the principles of Magna Carta, the Parliament of the United Kingdom was established in 1801 by the merger of Great Britain and Ireland under the Act of the Union. At this time, the House of Lords was superior to the House of Commons in both theory and practice. Parliament as we know it today and the supremacy of the House of Commons was established in the early 20th Century.

As the elected Member of Parliament (MP) for Reading East, I act as my constituents’ representative in Parliament. I am involved in considering and proposing new laws, and can use my position to ask Government ministers questions about current issues.

Like all MPs, I split my time between working in Parliament itself and working in Reading East.

Working in Reading East

In my constituency, I hold weekly advice surgeries, where people can come along to discuss any matters that concern them. I also attend functions, visit schools and businesses, do work experience and generally try to meet as many people as possible. This gives me further insight and context into issues that are often discussed when I return to Westminster.

Working in Parliament

When Parliament is sitting (meeting), I generally spend my time working in the House of Commons. This can include raising issues affecting my constituents, attending debates and voting on new laws. Most MPs are also members of committees, which look at issues in detail, from government policy and new laws, to wider topics like human rights.

If you would like more information you can see how I have voted on issues in the Commons, what questions I have tabled and debates I have attended, and what my parliamentary expenses are spent on.

You can see my recent appearances and speeches below:

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply. ONS Letter to Member - One Stay at home parent (PDF...

There is a statutory duty which requires that local authorities secure, as far as is practicable, sufficient services and activities to improve the wellbeing of young people. It is for local...

I thank my hon. Friend the Member for Shipley (Philip Davies) for being so brief. The Government oppose the amendments, but I will speak briefly because I want to give my right hon. Friend the...

As my hon. Friend knows, this Bill is expressly limited to matters of conduct. That has been made clear in the Bill and throughout the debates in this House and the other place. The power of...

My hon. Friend is making an important speech, but may I return him to his earlier comments about Lord Rennard, and to the point made by my hon. Friend the Member for Shipley (Philip Davies)...

It is a pleasure to be here on a Friday. This is not something that I have often been able to do in the past. It is also a pleasure to be able to listen to some of the older generation sallying...

I meant that being here on a Friday was exceptional for me, not for my right hon. Friend. Perhaps I did not make my point clearly. It has been a pleasure to listen to him and to the others who...

The Cabinet Office wishes to report that a cash advance from the Contingencies Fund has been sought for the UK Statistics Authority (referred to as the Statistics Board in the Statistics and...

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply. ONS Letter to Member - Jobseekers Allowance (PDF...

Cabinet Office has supported 10 incubators through its £10m Social Incubator Fund. The incubators cover all areas of England, with six of the incubators located outside of London. ...