In Parliament

There are three elements to Parliament today: the Crown, the House of Lords, and the House of Commons. These three elements work together to effectively ‘run’ the country by examining and challenging the work of the government (scrutiny), debating and passing laws (legislation), and enabling the government to raise taxes.

Founded on the principles of Magna Carta, the Parliament of the United Kingdom was established in 1801 by the merger of Great Britain and Ireland under the Act of the Union. At this time, the House of Lords was superior to the House of Commons in both theory and practice. Parliament as we know it today and the supremacy of the House of Commons was established in the early 20th Century.

As the elected Member of Parliament (MP) for Reading East, I act as my constituents’ representative in Parliament. I am involved in considering and proposing new laws, and can use my position to ask Government ministers questions about current issues.

Like all MPs, I split my time between working in Parliament itself and working in Reading East.

Working in Reading East

In my constituency, I hold weekly advice surgeries, where people can come along to discuss any matters that concern them. I also attend functions, visit schools and businesses, do work experience and generally try to meet as many people as possible. This gives me further insight and context into issues that are often discussed when I return to Westminster.

Working in Parliament

When Parliament is sitting (meeting), I generally spend my time working in the House of Commons. This can include raising issues affecting my constituents, attending debates and voting on new laws. Most MPs are also members of committees, which look at issues in detail, from government policy and new laws, to wider topics like human rights.

If you would like more information you can see how I have voted on issues in the Commons, what questions I have tabled and debates I have attended, and what my parliamentary expenses are spent on.

You can see my recent appearances and speeches below:

I also welcome my right hon. Friend to her new position and hope she treads a similar path to her outstanding predecessor. In that light, what approach does she favour in attempting to combat...

What recent assessment he has made of the prospects for the middle east peace process.

What steps is my hon. Friend taking to ensure that there is no further escalation of violence in Gaza, that Israel acts in a proportionate and responsible manner, and that international aid and...

May I welcome the Prime Minister’s strong words of leadership in yesterday’s article in The Sunday Times? Does he agree that strong and robust leadership, particularly from President...

May I welcome the Prime Minister’s strong words of leadership in yesterday’s article in The Sunday Times? Does he agree that strong and robust leadership, particularly from President...

I agree with the Foreign Secretary that there is fault on both sides of the argument, and I know that he is doing all that he can to create the conditions for a ceasefire. Does he agree that...

Many of my constituents will be inconvenienced today because of the politically motivated actions of union leaders. Does my right hon. Friend agree that the private sector has absorbed cuts to...

Many of my constituents will be inconvenienced today because of the politically motivated actions of union leaders. Does my right hon. Friend agree that the private sector has absorbed cuts to...

Many of my constituents will be inconvenienced today because of the politically motivated actions of union leaders. Does my right hon. Friend agree that the private sector has absorbed cuts to...

It is a pleasure to follow the passionate contribution of the former Chairman of the Select Committee, the hon. Member for Huddersfield (Mr Sheerman). To be honest, I was a tad surprised that...

Rob Wilson MP outside Westminster