In Parliament

There are three elements to Parliament today: the Crown, the House of Lords, and the House of Commons. These three elements work together to effectively ‘run’ the country by examining and challenging the work of the government (scrutiny), debating and passing laws (legislation), and enabling the government to raise taxes.

Founded on the principles of Magna Carta, the Parliament of the United Kingdom was established in 1801 by the merger of Great Britain and Ireland under the Act of the Union. At this time, the House of Lords was superior to the House of Commons in both theory and practice. Parliament as we know it today and the supremacy of the House of Commons was established in the early 20th Century.

As the elected Member of Parliament (MP) for Reading East, I act as my constituents’ representative in Parliament. I am involved in considering and proposing new laws, and can use my position to ask Government ministers questions about current issues.

Like all MPs, I split my time between working in Parliament itself and working in Reading East.

Working in Reading East

In my constituency, I hold weekly advice surgeries, where people can come along to discuss any matters that concern them. I also attend functions, visit schools and businesses, do work experience and generally try to meet as many people as possible. This gives me further insight and context into issues that are often discussed when I return to Westminster.

Working in Parliament

When Parliament is sitting (meeting), I generally spend my time working in the House of Commons. This can include raising issues affecting my constituents, attending debates and voting on new laws. Most MPs are also members of committees, which look at issues in detail, from government policy and new laws, to wider topics like human rights.

If you would like more information you can see how I have voted on issues in the Commons, what questions I have tabled and debates I have attended, and what my parliamentary expenses are spent on.

You can see my recent appearances and speeches below:

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply. ONS Letter to Member - Tobacco and Alcohol Deaths (PDF...

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply. ONS Letter to Member - Mortality Rate (PDF Document,...

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply. ONS Letter to Member - Self-Employed (PDF Document,...

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply. ONS Letter to Member - Census Records (PDF Document,...

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply. ONS Letter to Member - Claimants of Refugee Status (PDF...

I met the chair of the Charity Commission, William Shawcross, and its chief executive officer, Paula Sussex, last month, shortly before we published the draft Protection of Charities Bill. I will...

I do indeed. In the past, the Charity Commission was rightly criticised for regulatory failings. It now has new leadership, as I mentioned, with a strong board and a new chief executive officer....

I will be happy to meet HMRC. I would say that we have the autumn statement coming up, and the hon. Lady might like to look out for anything that might appear in it.

I thank my hon. Friend for all the work that he does. I hope that he and people in his constituency will support Giving Tuesday, which is on 2 December. That is a great opportunity for smaller...

We are working to offer practical support to the youth sector at a time when local authorities continue to make difficult decisions on how to deliver services. Our support focuses on promoting...

Rob Wilson MP outside Westminster