In Parliament

There are three elements to Parliament today: the Crown, the House of Lords, and the House of Commons. These three elements work together to effectively ‘run’ the country by examining and challenging the work of the government (scrutiny), debating and passing laws (legislation), and enabling the government to raise taxes.

Founded on the principles of Magna Carta, the Parliament of the United Kingdom was established in 1801 by the merger of Great Britain and Ireland under the Act of the Union. At this time, the House of Lords was superior to the House of Commons in both theory and practice. Parliament as we know it today and the supremacy of the House of Commons was established in the early 20th Century.

As the elected Member of Parliament (MP) for Reading East, I act as my constituents’ representative in Parliament. I am involved in considering and proposing new laws, and can use my position to ask Government ministers questions about current issues.

Like all MPs, I split my time between working in Parliament itself and working in Reading East.

Working in Reading East

In my constituency, I hold weekly advice surgeries, where people can come along to discuss any matters that concern them. I also attend functions, visit schools and businesses, do work experience and generally try to meet as many people as possible. This gives me further insight and context into issues that are often discussed when I return to Westminster.

Working in Parliament

When Parliament is sitting (meeting), I generally spend my time working in the House of Commons. This can include raising issues affecting my constituents, attending debates and voting on new laws. Most MPs are also members of committees, which look at issues in detail, from government policy and new laws, to wider topics like human rights.

If you would like more information you can see how I have voted on issues in the Commons, what questions I have tabled and debates I have attended, and what my parliamentary expenses are spent on.

You can see my recent appearances and speeches below:

I welcome the opportunity to debate this motion and thank the hon. Member for Garston and Halewood (Maria Eagle) for welcoming me to the Dispatch Box, if not for her good luck wishes. We are...

I have barely started. Let me get into my speech a little more, please. Likewise, the Archbishop of Canterbury, speaking at the launch of the inquiry report, stressed that a partisan approach...

As I said, I want to honour and respect the spirit of the Archbishop of Canterbury in speaking at the launch. I especially want to recognise the contributions made by my hon. Friends the Members...

As the report recognised, the reasons people are using food banks are very complex and frequently overlap. There is no one reason that explains the growth in their use in the UK or in other parts...

I will come to the hon. Gentleman in a moment if he will let me make a little more progress, because I want to talk about a personal experience. Last month, I visited a Tesco superstore in my...

I was struck by the generosity of local people kindly donating items to help others. By that stage, 88 boxes had already been sent to ReadiFood, a food bank in Reading. I have visited ReadiFood...

I am sorry that hon. Members have not listened to my opening comments in trying to make this a sensible and serious debate where, for the sake of all our constituents, we put to one side some of...

I have visited food banks in my constituency, and I obviously hope that all hon. Members have done so in theirs. It is very important that all Members of Parliament know what is going on on the...

Thank you for your guidance, Madam Deputy Speaker; thankfully, you are not taking it from Labour Back Benchers. We will discuss how more surplus food can be put to good use, including by...

As the hon. Gentleman probably heard during the last debate, more than 93% of jobseeker’s allowance and employment and support allowance claims are processed on time—at the moment,...

Rob Wilson MP outside Westminster